Camp O-AT-KA
O-AT-KA, founded in 1906, is a traditional boys’ summer camp located on Sebago Lake in Maine. O-AT-KA provides a nurturing and supportive environment for boys ages 8-16 with sessions of 2, 3, 4, & 7 weeks. The camp offers superb land and water-sports, along with a strong arts program located in an 8 studio art center. For older boys the camp offers a variety wilderness trips including sea-kayaking and canoeing,hiking, and rock climbing. New for 2012, is a two-week Maine Adventure Program for boys ages 15 -17 that includes sea-kayaking, mountain biking, rock climbing, hiking, and whitewater rafting. Traditional values, an integral part of camp life, are reinforced by a superb staff, through group living and daily camp gatherings...all helping to build a solid foundation for life which stresses values, skills, friendships, and fun.
Summer Address
593 Sebago Road
Sebago, ME 04029
1-800-818-8455
Winter Address
P.O. Box 239
Sebago, ME 04029
1-800-818-8455
Camp Reviews — Memories from Real Camp Families
Read these stories from our camp community and add yours:
Dan said... Tweet Share
Whenever I step foot on the property of Camp O-AT-KA, an instantly recognizable calm sets in. Put quite simply, it is the place on Earth where I feel most whole, most complete, and most at peace. For over ten years, Camp O-AT-KA has been my "check-in" point. After the worries and expectations of the school year have subsided, I always return to Camp O-AT-KA in order to "check-in" with myself and remind myself of who I truly am. Indeed, Camp O-AT-KA was where I discovered who I truly was. Camp's winning combination of an outstanding location, selfless staff, and rich tradition make it the perfect spot for any boy who is eager to grow and have a summer adventure that he will never forget. In fact, that first summer is often so memorable that he returns for another summer.......and then another......and then another.........and then another..........
Dylan said... Tweet Share
I first came to Camp O-AT-KA when I was 14 years old, at a time in my life when I was unsure of my place in my hometown and the world at large. Camp O-AT-KA changed all that. During that first summer I was challenged and grew in ways I would never have thought possible before, all the while learning invaluable life lessons about how to live harmoniously with others and what it means to be part of a community. I still cherish my memory during that first summer of looking out upon the gorgeous lake Sebago as lightning arced across the horizon, watching the shadows dance upon the faces of my cabin mates, as one of the fondest of my life. My summer as a Counselor-in-Training when I was 16 was a particularly important summer for me, and to this day I consider it to be the defining experience of my life, the time when I began in earnest the shift from boyhood to manhood. It was my firm conviction then, and after five years as a counselor at O-AT-KA this conviction has only grown stronger, that the rhythms of camp life, the variety of activities available for children to learn, the nature of sharing a cabin with fellow children, and simply living among the lake, trees, and wide spaces of the fields that make camp can provide for a truly unparalleled opportunity for personal growth, reflection, and just good old fashioned fun. I can only hope that if I ever grow up to have sons that they too will be able to have the same experience I had here.
Tanner said... Tweet Share
I have been at Camp O-AT-KA for thirteen summers of my life, I have had the blissful experience of growing up on the shores of lake Sebago. I have experienced O-AT-KA in three different lights, as a camper, staff member and as an alumni family member three generations strong. As a alumni family, Camp is always here for my family and we always feel welcome and included in the vibrant life of O-AT-KA. As a camper, O-AT-KA was my Never Never Land, my escape from the pressures of home, school, sports and girls. Camp was the one place where I felt like I could be my true self and express my individuality and personality. O-AT-KA allowed me to learn many new skills and abilities while also teaching me independence and values which have become my personal moral center. Now as a staff member of six summers I experience Camp in a very meaningfully different way. I get the privilege of being the instructor and counselor for these young boys and men and to foster their own experience here at O-AT-KA. The campers and staff are one big camp family, and I have had the pleasure of building life long relationships with not only other staff members and alumni, but with the wonderful campers that I have worked with and seen progress and grow up into young men. Camp O-AT-KA is not just a summer camp for boys on a beautiful lake, surrounded by tall pine trees and wide fields; Camp O-AT-KA is a way of life.
David said... Tweet Share
Eleven years ago I arrived at Camp O-AT-KA apprehensive, and doubting my decision to attend an overnight camp. However, no more than five minutes after my parents left, I was whisked away by a group of campers to go play soccer on the Junior Ball Field, and an hour later I was covered in soap attempting to beat my counselor in a water slide race. My angst quickly escaped me. I loved camp so much my first year, I wrote my parents a letter pleading with them to allow me to stay another three weeks. When they arrived to pick me up, I broke down into tears because I did not want to leave. Ever since, camp has become my second home. One of my favorite parts about camp is the wide spectrum of activities. During my seven years as a camper I participated in activities such as tennis, soccer, and boating, but also activities that I could not take part in outside of camp such as photography, stain glass, and racing sailing. I tried sailing eight years ago, and now I am a racing sailing instructor. The instructors in the activities have a profound knowledge of the activity, but more importantly they have passion and zeal. However, from my perspective the best part of camp is the people. The diversity of the counselors and campers creates an amicable atmosphere that is ubiquitous throughout camp. Living in a cabin is a unique experience, which allows one to learn about various cultures, develop independence, and truly find one’s own identity. It is amazing how within just three days of being in a cabin, one feels as if he is already friends with everyone. One of the most rewarding parts of camp is the long lasting friendships that are made at camp. Without doubt some of my best friends are from O-AT-KA. Although one does not have the opportunity to see ones friends throughout the year, it makes arriving at camp exciting, and the three, four, or seven weeks of camp that much better. My favorite moment at camp was the day our sailing instructor told us we could attempt to sail across Lake Sebago, which is an impossible task to complete in one 55minute period- but he still managed to instill confidence in us that the task could be completed. It was one of the final days of sailing, and it was an opportunity for us to implement everything we had learned during the session. We embarked on our journey to the other side, and unfortunately we never made it. However, we had so much fun on our boat, talking about memories from camp, and also about life at home. We also were allowed to sail freely in near perfect conditions, while still being monitored by a counselor. Eleven years later I still find myself returning to camp year after year. I have been a camper, a C.I.T., and now I am a counselor. People always ask, “Don’t you want to do something else with your summer?” I immediately answer with a fervent, “No”. Camp fosters such a comforting atmosphere that, everyday I am not at camp I am longing to be there, and every day I am at camp I regret the day I have to leave.
Helen said... Tweet Share
Dear Ron and Camp O-AT-KA Staff, My husband and I cannot begin to express enough gratitude to all of the camp staff for keeping our son safe, healthy, and happy at camp this summer. Our son, Chris, is 10 years old with anaphylactic food allergies to milk, egg, and nuts. He is also contact allergic (will get hives on his skin if he comes into contact with the above). He is extremely responsible, but until camp, he has only had 2 people cook for him; myself and his god-mother. We arrived at camp to have Heather (the Camp Mom) and Nick (the head chef) greet us and spend many hours going over the menu and his diet. A list was created of all the foods Chris is able to have in the kitchen and on the menu. We discussed what would be substituted in the event the meal was not appropriate and the system for how Chris would be served safely! Having food allergies can sometimes cause one to be weary about trying new foods. Chris went to camp with an idea of being independent and eating camp food. I was not sure if this expectation would be met, only because of his food allergies. It all came true. Chris not only ate camp food, but tried some new foods that Nick prepared for him. (He even asked if Nick could come live with us :) Thank you so much for allowing Chris to have an independent and safe experience at Camp. His counselors (Bryan and Russell) were incredible in understanding his needs and meeting them, the kitchen staff at preparing safe, delicious food, the camp nurse for always looking out to make sure every situation was considered, to the Unit Head and Camp for making sure Chris was taken care of on trip days and camp outs. Being a mother of a child with severe food allergies, I am over-protective. I am extremely impressed with all of the staff at Camp O-AT-KA and feel blessed that Chris was able to have such an incredible experience. Sincerely, Helen Ward
“I greatly enjoyed speaking with Laurie (Guide at Maine Camp Experience). Thanks to her guidance, ideas and suggestions we truly feel that our ultimate choice is the right one for us. We can trust that our seven year old daughter will have a wonderful summer!”

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Copyright © 2014 Maine Camp Experience

Copyright © 2014 Maine Camp Experience